Where to Look for Answers

Untitled

Before you commit your novel to a publisher, do your homework. Make sure you are a good fit. Remember, there is no one-size-fits-all. How do you do this? Where do you look for answers?

  1. The first stop is to look at the website. If you like it, write down some of the titles they publish.
  2. Go to Amazon and look at the books. Use the Search Inside feature and read some of the book. Is this a book you would be happy to have sitting next to yours? Look at the cover, the formatting, and particularly at the writing. The reviews are also important. It’s not so much a matter of how many reviews as what they say. Do any of the reviews mention the writing or the plot or the characters?
  3. Preditors and Editors is a website (pred-ed.com) with an extensive database of writing related information. The Book Publisher and Distributor Listings are alphabetized. Some are recommended, others not. If your publisher does NOT appear on these pages, go on to there sites. But, if you publisher is “not recommended” proceed with caution
  4. Poets & Writers (pw.org) also has a listing of small presses. Since a lot of their readers are poets, they concentrate on publishers who offer to publish poetry. Again, lack of a listing is not a black mark.
  5. Writers Beware (http://www.sfwa.org/other-resources/for-authors/writer-beware/) is sponsored by the Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America, but the website is a valuable resource for any writer, regardless of genre. There section on small presses begins with section that includes Issues to Consider before Submitting, followed by a section on Evaluating a Small Press–both well worth reading.
  6. Last and probably the least reliable is Google. You can type in the name of the publisher and add the word Reviews. This can warn of some egregious practices, but it can also bring up rants by rejected authors.

If you have looked at all of the above and still believe your chosen publisher might be “the one,” it is time to contact someone and ask a few questions. Here is an example, but you will have many of your own to add.

  • What do choicesyou do for me as an author?
  • What do you expect from me?
  • How do you publicize your books?
  • How much will it cost me?
  • Do you have a succession plan?

Don’t be afraid to ask questions. After all, you are entrusting this company with your baby–the one you spent months or years writing. Make sure you have a good fit. Divorcing a publisher can be more difficult than divorcing a spouse.

NEXT TIME – HINTS ON EDITING

editing 1

Small Publishers: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (Part 2)

© 2009 Travis Balinas, Flickr | CC-BY-ND | via Wylio

© 2009 Travis Balinas, Flickr | CC-BY-ND | via Wylio

It is the beginning of a new year and time to take another look at small publishers. This month we will discuss the BAD and leave the Ugly for the shortest month. Don’t want to look at them too long.

BAD IS A RELATIVE TERM

What is meant by a “bad” small publisher? Probably every person who reads this blog will be able to give a definition of a “bad” publisher, and there are good odds that no two of those definitions will be the same. To our mind, a bad publisher is one who treats the author badly. What does this mean? Here’s where things get relative and we are reminded of the old adage that one man’s meat is another man’s poison.

Before you can define “bad,” you must be clear in your own mind what you want from a publisher. If all you want is an imprint on the copyright page and bragging rights of having a publisher as you wave your book in front of (possibly) envious friends and relatives, then you don’t need to read any more. Read Part 3 next month for the straightest and easiest path to get there.

If you are serious about writing, or even serious about the one book you have finished, you need to dig deeper. Joe Konrath wrote a full page bulleted list of what it means to treat an author badly in his blog Do Legacy Publishers Treat Authors Badly? Yes, legacy publishers treat authors badly, but so do many small publishers. After all, they aspire to be big boys one day.

Adding to all the unkind ways legacy publishers treat authors, small publishers have a few more bullet points, chief among them being taking the author’s money to publish his or her book. Small publishers of an entirely new breed are multiplying–fee based publishing. Granted that small publishers have small budgets (otherwise they’d be big publishers), there is some justification for that. It is the individual author who must decide what is reasonable and what is unreasonable. Unfortunately, all too often the author gets the crumbs from the royalty table–and pays for the privilege.

When looking into small publishers, consider which points you consider bad treatment, and search the publisher’s website to see how they treat their authors. Contact one of their authors and ask about their opinion of the publisher. Does the publisher treat the author as a colleague or a product? Ask questions. Do your homework.

For more insight on publishers treating authors badly,

Roz Morris, author of Nail Your Novel, wrote: Why do authors get treated so badly?

Jane Friedman’s blog: Climbing the walls

NEXT Month: THE UGLY

Stephen Pierzchala, Flickr via Wylio

2005 Stephen Pierzchala, Flickr via Wylio

SMALL PUBLISHERS: THE GOOD, THE BAD, AND THE UGLY

 

© 2005 Erica Cherup, Flickr | CC-BY-ND | via Wylio

© 2005 Erica Cherup, Flickr | CC-BY-ND | via Wylio

This is the time of year for happiness and good cheer, so today will only cover THE GOOD, leaving THE BAD and THE UGLY for another day.

A GOOD SMALL PUBLISHER IS THE AUTHOR’S PARTNER

A good partnership is one in which both partners collaborate to produce a quality product. In publishing, as in any other business, both partners need to contribute.

Contributing does not always mean contributing money! The author has already contributed a great deal of time and work to produce a quality manuscript. The best of the small publishers consider themselves to be the venture capitalist of the partnership. Although, there are good small cost-splitting publishers, authors should be careful before taking that route.

BOTH partners collaborate to edit the manuscript to make it the best it can be. With traditional publishers, the editor gives the author very little (if any) say in how the book is edited. Small publishers are almost always approachable. There is a real person at the other end of the telephone or email, and that person is interested in each and every book he or she publishes.

BOTH partners collaborate to find a cover image and design that suits the book. Even thought this is within the purview of the publisher, the author should always be able to voice his or her opinion and discuss any points of difference between them. However, the publisher usually has ties to graphic designers with experience in cover design that most authors lack,

BOTH partners should collaborate on the release date. Why? because both need to work very hard to make that date as visible as possible, and both the publisher and the author have other things happening in their lives and need to schedule accordingly.

BOTH partners need to work on marketing and promotion of the book. This is true of all publishers–large or small. Of course, small publishers have small budgets, but they also give more personal attention to each campaign and each book.

BOTH partners need to continue to search for new and innovative ways to publicize the book. The number of books being published annually has never been higher, and all of them are jostling for attention.

 

Next time: What about the BAD Small Publishers?

© 2009 Travis Balinas, Flickr | CC-BY-ND | via Wylio

© 2009 Travis Balinas, Flickr | CC-BY-ND | via Wylio